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Lars and Nikolaj Kynde

Lars and Nikolaj Kynde are coming to Bodø with two projects, Tasteful Turntable and a workshop at Nordic kid´s hub.

Lars Kynde is a composer that delights in creating the instruments on which his compositions are played – in fact, these two aspects of music-making are not so easily separated in his case and the invention of new instruments and the music created for them melt into surprising new forms. Lars Kynde’s works focus on the mutual influence of the music, the instrument and the notation system. By building physical sculptures, mechanical machines and three-dimensional scores he seeks new ways of constructing and comprehending musical structures.

Nikolaj Kynde is a composer and engineer, who in his work strives to combine the two crafts into one, whether it is building machines for music, or creating music for machines. Even though most of Kynde’s music is produced by machines, the goal is always to reach the listener’s soul. This is done by allowing curated interaction between the music and the listeners. Both in his Sound art installations, gastronomic works and musical games, the listener’s curiosity and involvement key to experiencing the music. Nikolaj Kynde is educated in electronic music composition from the Royal Conservatoire in the Hague and in audio software engineering from Aalborg University in Copenhagen.

To see and hear more of Lars Kynde:

Web page

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Youtube

Lars Kynde’s works focus on the mutual influence of the music, the instrument and the notation system. By building physical sculptures, mechanical machines and three-dimensional scores he seeks new ways of constructing and comprehending musical structures. The instruments contain a duality that enables them to be presented both as installations on exhibitions and as instruments in concerts.

Lars Kynde often collaborates with artists in other fields to create a broader range of musical experience. He has performed and exhibited extensively abroad, including in Japan, China, Mexico, Australia and most of the European Countries.
With inspiration from historical performance practices in combination with modern technologies and free imagination, Kynde’s works suggest an alternative basis for future music.

The festival’s theme is “truth?”. Can music be “true”? Is it something you are struggling with in your compositions?

As our works have relations to science it is often assumed that my works search for some objective truth in a scientific sense. But the opposite is actually the case. I am very interested in what could be called subjective truth. Subjective truth is linked to believing, individual associations or world view. And what is interesting in the context of the work presented at this festival is that even our perception, the foundation of empirical research, is highly individualized, subjective and can be manipulated either by the context or by the perceiver him/her self.

Your work with design, installations and food. Can you please tell us about how you develop your projects?

Our works are always interdisciplinary and often a result of a collaboration with artists and experts with other backgrounds than mine. I find it interesting how the method of collaboration and the chosen hierarchy established between collaborating artists formulate the artistic outcome, and also how these modes of collaboration reflect structures in society at large. The Tasteful Turntable came out as a collaboration between me, my brother composer Nikolaj Kynde and the chefs Mette Martinussen and Augusta Sørensen. It was not from the beginning fixated who should have the responsibility of which parts, and during the process, we have intervened in each other’s professional “home-fields” trying to put ourselves in the other’s shoes. Yet, our authorities within different professions became an important factor in decision making.

How does sound effect our perception of food? Can you tell us about your piece Tasteful Turntables that will be performed at the Nordic Music Days in Bodø?

Tasteful Turntable is a performance that explores the sense-interference between the two senses of tasting and hearing. A slowly turning dining table is designed specially to provide the guests with parallel stimuli through the ears and mouth. The composition will be performed in an intimate setting for only twelve guests at a time. The food should not be considered as a full meal, but rather a sound-and-taste experience.

There have the past few years been a boom in scientific research in the area of how sound affects the taste of our food. Commercially there has also been large interest from Heston Blumenthal in 1997 introduced his iPod-enhanced seafood dish, Sound of the Sea, and till today where Ben & Jerry’s is considering a sonic range of ice-cream flavours. This version of Tasteful Turntable is made by a team of collaborators: Chef Mette Martinussen, Food-artist Augusta Sørensen, Ceramic artist Giulia Crispiani and the Composers Nikolaj Kynde and Lars Kynde. Together we have carried out extensive interdisciplinary research to establish a cross-modal language of artistic expression for this piece.

It seems that you do a lot of work in inventing new instruments, and way to interact with the audiences. What do you want us to sense and listen for in your music and installations?

To me, music-making is a participatory activity, a structured playground for subtle social interaction bringing inter-human aspects forward that we do not experience elsewhere in society. These aspects are not easily recorded and remain ephemeral qualities from a pre-Edison time. Simply, you have to be there!

Yet, my instruments and installations are always full of modern technologies. This is because we cannot turn back time. As modern beings, all we can do to preserve ephemeral musical qualities is to reinvent them in a modern context.

Tasteful Turntable

How does sound affect our perception of food, and how does taste affect our experience of music? Tasteful Turntable is a sensuous performance that explores this sense-interference between music and gastronomy. A slowly turning dining table is designed specially to provide the guests with parallel stimuli through the ears and mouth. The composition will be performed in an intimate setting for only twelve guests at a time. The food should not be considered as a full meal, but rather a taste experience.

Tasteful Turntable is a ritual performance about the synaesthetic interference between the two senses of tasting and hearing. The performance takes place around a slowly rotating dining table designed to let the guests experience parallel stimuli through these two senses. Different small dishes containing only one bite each are carefully positioned on the table, and four guests wearing headphones are seated around it.

As the table slowly turns, the guests taste the flavours and listen to a synchronized music composition coherent with the position of the foods and their tastes. My work explores different aspects of synesthesia. How does stimulation of one sense affect our perception through another? I am particularly interested in how music inspires our sense of sight, taste and smell, and in what manner our experience through these senses alters the perception and creation of the music.

The new version of Tasteful Turntable is a furthering this interdisciplinary research with a team of collaborators (Composer Nikolaj Kynde, Chef Mette Martinussen, Food-artist Augusta Sørensen, and Ceramic artist Giulia Crispiani). There have the past few years been a boom in scientific research in the area of how sound affects the taste of our food. Commercially there has also been large interest from Heston Blumenthal in 1997 introduced his iPod-enhanced seafood dish, Sound of the Sea, and till today where Ben & Jerry’s is considering a sonic range of ice-cream flavours. Lars Kyndes goal is never the less to use this field of research as a medium for artistic expression.

Nordic Kid's Hub

Lars Kynde and Nikolay Kynde will host an explorative sound workshop for kids at Nordic Kid’s Hub!